Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

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#1 2012-03-11 13:21:10

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Oh my aching back... :)

I survived my first hog butchering this weekend! - But    O      M     G      I am so tired. :P

And our mixed flock is hatching ...    :happycrowd"

More later - it's off to church for now.  :hi:

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2012-03-11 13:21:10

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#2 2012-03-11 14:58:34

Flat Rock Farm
Member
From: Branchton, Ontario Canada
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 3359

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Well between you and Claire sounds like doing up a pig is a lot of work.  At least you will have the benefits of some nice pork, there is a huge difference in taste when you raise them yourself. :thumbs: 
We get our beef from our neighbor and the taste is nothing like what you can buy in the store. :eat:

Chicks hatching today :jumping: keep us updated what hatched.  I think you said you have some silkies in the mix as well.  Maggie will love them :thumbsup:

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#3 2012-03-11 15:08:11

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Aching back, but probably happy tummy! Sounds like people here are going to be feasting! Hard work certainly does pay off :) :)

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#4 2012-03-11 15:41:34

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

I know exactly what you mean. :shock: I'll write what we did on the other thread, but would love to hear how it went when you are rested.

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#5 2012-03-11 18:35:34

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Chick report - 3 Speckled Sussex, 3 silkies, 2 Polish, 3 black chicks w/ yellow feet (from my free ranging trio!) 13 eggs left and still pipping. =D

Brief hog report - The process went smoothly even though three people that promised to help didn't show...  :sad:

A neighbor dropped what he was doing to come give me a hand with scalding and hanging.  (Bless his heart) :)

We started at 5pm Friday, he left at after we hung them up, a cleaned and dressed them by myself  :sick:  finishing at 9pm. :P

Overnite was clear and 29°F - Perfect!

Sat morning three helpers arrived at 7am and we had breakfast of fresh eggs, home cured bacon (that a helper brought) and buttered toast with my homemade blackberry jam. :eat:  And lots of coffee.

The big pig hung at 158lbs and the little one was 130lbs. (From 230 and 200)

We cut all day, two helpers left at noon, my oldest daughter and my Mom stayed at it till 5pm.

I roasted a whole rack of ribs and chine for three hours at 250°F. It was VERY good! We ate it all!  :eat:

Sausage grinding and bacon curing will proceed at a date in the near future!

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#6 2012-03-11 20:56:46

Flat Rock Farm
Member
From: Branchton, Ontario Canada
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 3359

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Wow what a lot of work, but well worth it I am sure :thumbs:

:congrats: on the chicks so far!!!!

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#7 2012-03-11 21:25:32

NaturesPace
Member
From: Augusta county VA, USA
Registered: 2011-12-20
Posts: 915
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Wow sounds like a lot of work!

Good luck on the. Rest of the hatch. :chickout:


More pictures and videos of chicks. www.outoforderacres.com

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#8 2012-03-12 04:28:53

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

:applause: for all the work ya'll are have put into feeding your family fresh farm raised pork!

This sounds like more work than I thought it would be though. I had it in my head that raising the pig was the most work...sounds like butchering and processing it is just as time consuming if you do it yourself.

And :congrats: on the new chicks!!


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#9 2012-03-12 12:57:28

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Yummy on the ribs!! MD, what is chine?

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#10 2012-03-12 13:21:54

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Good for you Glen.  You will love the results, sounds like you had some already :eat: 

It takes a while to take a piggy apart, though it was faster this tike on our second one we have even done.  We drove 7 hours each way to pick our carcass up and we only had the sides cut, hams, shoulders were deboned, and they took the meat from the legs/trotters (for sausage).  So the first night was about 6 hours getting it into smaller bits and wrapped and in the freezer.  When we raise our own, we'll do the killing here too, less stress on the animal, and I think if you are set up right can be a streamlined process.  Great you had some help anyway. 

The grinding of sausage we had taken from the other cuts etc and fat/meat took hours.  Probably 4 to 6 poor machine!  It's a Waring pro and not that big.  I had to cube it all into 1" cubes.  Then mixing the sausages with the right herbs took another 4 hours or so, while I was soaking the salted skins, and cleaning up from the first go around. 

The sausages we made were out of this world, Lincolnshire, Cumberland, English banger and an Italian. The Cumberland and Italian are drying a little in the fridge before we freeze them tonight as we just made them yeseterday, but all the English bangers are in the freezer.  It is a huge amount of work.  By having help, you can cut down the length of time but I bet for educated newbies to do justice to a pig, it takes about 30-36 hours of work. 

We are definitely getting a bigger mixer for the next time.  The kitchen aid only does 5 pounds of sausage at a time, so even the big batches needed 4 mini batches as the sausage meat is so cold and heavy, you can't do it by hand.  The low tech meat mixers are expensive but would have saved us 3 hours or more.  Our sausage stuffer only holds 5 pounds too and we have an antique one that holds 20 pounds that also would have speeded the process up by another 2 hours I bet so we didn't have to keep refilling as the 9 foot lengths of 29/32 gut held 6 pounds of sausage meat or more.

Hope your sausage making goes smoothly, you do get into a knack and if you made patties with a hamburger press, that would work too and can save you some money on skins!  You will love them anyway!  :thumbs:  Bacon and hams you have to wait a week or so depending on the recipe, but it is heaven too!  I can't wait for ours.  We are salting/brining bacon/hams, the the hams we will freeze, and the bacon we will slice, put into meal size portions then freeze the whole bunch.  We just don't have reliable ambient temperatures that I trust for keeping meat round here.  Lucky you got your 29*F there, that was perfect timing!  Can't wait to hear more.

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#11 2012-03-12 13:52:03

Lindy Lou
Member
From: Priceville, Ontario
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 999

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Good for you too Claire. It sounds like an enourmous amount of work for just two people. I know that the quality of the meat is superior to anything you could buy in the stores but I have a question regarding costs. Obviously you need a bit of equipment to process the meat. What do you think the cost for equipment,skins, salt,spices and the cost of the pig works out to? How much freezer space does a whole pig require? I just trying to work out if it is a cost effective enterprise to do if you have to buy all the start up equipment etc in one go.


Some of us are driven by the need to make animals a part of our lives. We are soothed by their presence, fascinated by their behavior, and amused by their antics.

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#12 2012-03-13 01:15:59

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Susan wrote:

Yummy on the ribs!! MD, what is chine?

...those little stegosaurus backbone thingys on the spine... the meat between them is oh so yummy. in this pic they are taking them off, but I cooked the whole thing!
http://www.amazingribs.com/images/pix/rib_cuts/removing_chine.jpg

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#13 2012-03-13 03:46:03

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

I still haven't got my pics uploaded.  Impressive bit of meat and carcass Glen!  :thumbs:  We had Cumberland sausages and chips for tea :eat: We were making little sausage patties as we went along, making sausages to make sure the recipe was OK :whistle:

I think if you raise your own it is cheaper, if you buy one done it is a lot more expensive.  We had a crappy slicer the first year that we got used, it was serrated blade and blunt so we couldn't sharpen it or clean it properly, the next year we bought an industrial slicer.  The next year after that, we went to an auction for beekeeping equipment and came home with a big 20 pound sausage stuffer, they are not cheap even at an auction but it is antique and needs some time to spend cleaning it.  It's kind of an evolution.  This is only the second pig we have done and each time we learn something and say, that will make it easier nest time, so we'll look out for it. 

At a push you can mix by hand, make patties (as skins are expensive) but we still had some salted in the fridge from 3 years ago when we did the last pig, and it was fine. I bet I still have enough for another 100 pounds of meat.  Spices and breadcrumbs are cheap at Bulkbarn and mental note if you use your own fennel seed/sage/garlic powder you grew, you don't need as much!  Talk about potent, and free!!

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#14 2012-03-13 13:03:46

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Thanks for the info you guys! Makes plucking and gutting chickens seem like a walk in the park lol. MD- the chine sounds awesome. I'm going to have to try it some day :)

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#15 2012-03-13 14:53:27

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

Our chine and (spinal column :shock:) got roasted and went in the stock. We skimmed it, 5 gallons of thick gelatinous stock with 1" or fat on the top, chickens loved that fat.  And yesterday, the rendering fat leftovers.  It actually and smelled looked like steel cut oats porridge, you wouldn't have liked it Lynn, but the chooks went crazy for it.

Pork chops tonight on the BBQ! :eat: Yay!

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#16 2012-03-14 13:43:50

Amblecroft
Member
From: Millbrook, Ontario
Registered: 2011-08-03
Posts: 448
Website

Re: Oh my aching back... :)

I really enjoy all this information.  You guys are inspiring and yes, doing up a few chickens seems like a walk in the park compared to the pig!!


Susan Buttivant at Amblecroft,
Chaparral Pyrenean Shepherds and Petits Bassets
http://www3.sympatico.ca/chaparral/amblecroft.html

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