Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

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#26 2011-11-17 13:55:58

Lindy Lou
Member
From: Priceville, Ontario
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 999

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

You know what they say Paula " If you don't use it you Lose it" :whistle:


Some of us are driven by the need to make animals a part of our lives. We are soothed by their presence, fascinated by their behavior, and amused by their antics.

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2011-11-17 13:55:58

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#27 2011-11-17 14:03:45

Young Heritage
Member
From: Gainesville, Georgia
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 157

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

I am ready anytime and good with most anything you guys come up with.


FBCM and Euskal Oiloa

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#28 2011-11-17 15:18:51

Flat Rock Farm
Member
From: Branchton, Ontario Canada
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 3359

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

Lindy Lou wrote:

You know what they say Paula " If you don't use it you Lose it" :whistle:

Very funny Lynn :P  It's true of a few things..............:oops:

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#29 2011-12-28 15:32:56

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

It's almost the New Year :wine: so time to get our group started!

I think it would be very appropriate to start with the Euskal Oiloa Breed Standard as Topic 1. We can cover common defects (duck foot, roach back, etc) at the same time. Although not truely genetics it would help define the end goal of all this breeding and selection. And Lisa already got us started so we can take all the nuggets from that thread and build not it.

I am still not 100% sure how we will go about this but on January 1 I can start a new post with this as the topic and we can see how it evolves if that works for everyone?


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#30 2011-12-28 18:21:56

Lindy Lou
Member
From: Priceville, Ontario
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 999

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

I have my Genetics of the Fowl and my Websters Dictionary on hand. The dictionary is for all the big words I can't pronounce or comprehend of which the first pages had many!!!
So I may be the Slow Poke of the group but I'm ready whenever you are. :duh:


Some of us are driven by the need to make animals a part of our lives. We are soothed by their presence, fascinated by their behavior, and amused by their antics.

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#31 2011-12-28 18:44:43

Island Girl
Member
From: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Isla
Registered: 2011-07-06
Posts: 1403

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

Lindy Lou can we share the Slow Poke status  :please: 

XOX Monika

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#32 2011-12-28 20:05:22

Lindy Lou
Member
From: Priceville, Ontario
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 999

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

Absolutely. Although I've decided to do my studying like this :wine: instead of that :surfing:


Some of us are driven by the need to make animals a part of our lives. We are soothed by their presence, fascinated by their behavior, and amused by their antics.

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#33 2011-12-29 12:24:12

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

poplar girl wrote:

It's almost the New Year :wine: so time to get our group started!

I think it would be very appropriate to start with the Euskal Oiloa Breed Standard as Topic 1. We can cover common defects (duck foot, roach back, etc) at the same time. Although not truely genetics it would help define the end goal of all this breeding and selection. And Lisa already got us started so we can take all the nuggets from that thread and build not it.

I am still not 100% sure how we will go about this but on January 1 I can start a new post with this as the topic and we can see how it evolves if that works for everyone?

That sounds very good PG!  Thanks so much for taking the reins!  :thumbsup:

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#34 2012-01-04 02:44:50

ChestnutRidge
Member
From: Western Virginia
Registered: 2011-07-05
Posts: 251
Website

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

Hmm.  I was originally not going to join in because I thought you were doing online chatting, but if it will just be here on the forum, that sounds perfect!  I'm a bit behind and have no EOs ( :lol: ) but I'll get right on that and at least read along.

Sounds like fun!

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#35 2012-01-04 02:48:29

ChestnutRidge
Member
From: Western Virginia
Registered: 2011-07-05
Posts: 251
Website

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

The Hutt book seems to be viewable here in its entirety, but each page loads a bit slowly.

http://chla.library.cornell.edu/cgi/t/t … amp;seq=12

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#36 2012-01-04 03:12:47

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

Great! :thumbsup:  Welcome to the study group!  Thanks for the link!

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#37 2012-01-07 16:59:14

ChestnutRidge
Member
From: Western Virginia
Registered: 2011-07-05
Posts: 251
Website

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

I really love old science books (on any topic, actually - the average text was so much more advanced and well-written only 60 years ago...) and this Hutt book is fantastic!  I just finished the first chapter this morning as I sit here with my coffee and am getting ready to dive into chapter 2.  I enjoyed the background information; Hutt begins by explaining the reptilian roots of birds and then discusses birds, fowl, wild fowl, and finally domestic fowl, coming closer and closer to the topic at hand.  Here are some quotes which I found interesting once I began taking notes, in case they are interesting to anyone else:

p. 13: “Most mutations are recessive to the wild type.”

p. 14: “In addition to the mutations which cause conspicuous changes, many others exert almost imperceptible effects by themselves but occur in such numbers that many of them together induce very marked changes.  Such are the genes affecting body size, capacity for egg production, ability to resist disease, and most other characters of economic importance.”

p. 15: (Began with specific examples including English vs. American Wyandottes of the 1920 and Leghorns from 1920 to 1930) “A glance through poultry books of the nineteenth century shows that over a period of years the approved sizes, shapes, and colors in some breeds have varied almost as much as women’s clothes.”

p. 16: “Definitions. It is evident from the foregoing that there can be no hard and fast rule about what constitutes a breed or variety.  A breed is really a group of fowls related by descent and breeding true for certain characteristics which the breeders agree to recognize as the ones distinguishing the breed.  Within such a group there may be variations in color, comb, beard, and other characters, certain of which the breeders agree to recognize as varietal characteristics.”

p. 17: “Breed standards can be criticized from the standpoint that they are unduly concerned with colors, comb characters, and other fancy points.  The shapes prescribed depend upon the type of plumage as much as on the body conformation, or more.  The yellow shanks preferred for some breeds in the showroom are more likely to be associated with a poor egg record than a good one.  On the other hand, some standard, description, or specified range of variation is necessary if well-established valuable breeds are to be maintained.”

p. 17: “To a limited extent a breed is an inbred race; i.e., the elimination of characters not wanted and the constant selection for the breed characteristics desired have resulted in each long-established breed being relatively homozygous for a certain set of genes.  These are not the same in different breeds.  As a result, what the poultryman considers as different breeds and varieties are really more or less inbred strains."

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#38 2012-01-07 18:37:43

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: Let's get this genetic study group started!

One thing I liked particularly was his refusal to be decisive as to the origin of the modern chicken - even Darwin believed it was derived solely from the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus). However recent research has now proven conclusively that Gallus sonneratii contributed the genes for yellow legs. It's very tempting, even for scientists, to state as a fact something that one thinks to be true, when one isn't  actually 100% certain.

One does have to keep in mind, though, that the book is more than 60 years old, and there have been a few more recent developments. No-one (almost no-one. . . at least no evolutionary scientists. . .) today talks of birds as evolving from reptiles (in fact reptiles are not really a coherent scientific group. Scientists group organisms into clades; a clade  includes a common ancestor and all its descendants. Any clade that includes all reptiles also includes birds.) Birds evolved from (some say still are) dinosuars.

Last edited by ipf (2012-01-07 18:44:00)

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