Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

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#1 2013-02-09 15:09:01

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Side Sprigs

The genetics of side sprigs are not all that clearly understood.

I can't get to a free version of this paper online to share but Asmundson (1926) in his paper Inheritance of Side Sprigs indicated side sprigs which develop at the back end of the single comb are caused by the combined action of two autosomal complementary genes. So a line of birds that only had one of these dominant genes would not produce sprigs. If mated to a different line that had the other dominant gene, which again showed no sprigs, they could produce birds with sprigs.

Further reading I have seen a few people indicate that roosters will show side sprigs earlier and more clearly than females because of their more developed comb. Sprigs can be seen in cockerels by about 3 - 4 weeks of age, but it may require several months in pullets. and the side sprig in a female may remain much less pronounced so will be easier to miss.

Sigrid Van Dort and David Hancock (well respected poultry genetics experts) both seem to agree that dominant complementary genes are involved. Here is a cut and past of one of David's comments (as blackdotte on BYC):

Side sprigs are caused when two dominant genes are concurrently present.
If only one or the other is present you will not get side sprigs, but will be breeding carriers.
This is the reason why side sprigs can suddenly appears when two perfectly combed, & totally unrelated birds are mated together.
Test mating is a very difficult & complex process for side sprigs.
David

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/45680 … hereditary

If you read the online forum discussions, because predicting the inheritance of side sprigs is so complicated and a side sprig is an immediate disqualification at a show many breeders will tell you to simply never use a bird with side sprigs for breeding.

Like any other trait, I weight the other good traits of the bird against the negative. I have one rooster with a side sprig and will be using him for pair breeding this year. He is a very nice bird for all other traits in my opinion. None of the hens and pullets I will use for breeding have side sprigs.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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2013-02-09 15:09:01

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#2 2013-02-09 16:08:11

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: Side Sprigs

My pullets that had side sprigs developed them at/after point of lay, ie 26-28wks...

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#3 2013-02-09 23:58:45

kenya
Member
From: Stratford, Ontario
Registered: 2012-04-21
Posts: 108

Re: Side Sprigs

The judge at the woodstock show told Kathy that sidesprigs can also be caused by an injury to the comb.

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#4 2013-02-10 04:07:26

Micah and Kiah
Member
From: West Grey
Registered: 2012-04-20
Posts: 839

Re: Side Sprigs

kenya wrote:

The judge at the woodstock show told Kathy that sidesprigs can also be caused by an injury to the comb.

Yep he said an injury could cause a proud flesh. Like growth looking like a sprig

A show guy told us the sprigs can be removed?


All the best,

Kiah and Micah

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#5 2013-02-10 14:31:04

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: Side Sprigs

Altering of a bird through removal of side sprigs (unless it is a dubbed breed) is not permitted by the APA if you read the SOP. Same would go for removal of feather stubs.

I'm sure it is possible to creat side sprig through injury as well but I think all of us know that in our EOs these side sprigs are genetic and something we need to select against in balance with our selection for and against other traits. We can probably thank cross breeding with the pendesenca for most of our EO side sprig problems.

The above information does mean that side sprigs will likely keep popping up for several generations even if you stop using birds with side sprigs for breeding. And that you need to look closely, especially at the hens since the side sprigs can develop later and be much smaller.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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