Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

A place to find out more and share what you know about this awesome rare poultry breed! **NOTE: Those who wish to register as a new member on the forum are asked to email eochickenforum@gmail.com and an Administrator will gladly help you join the forum!

You are not logged in.

Adverts

Adverts

#26 2011-08-31 13:15:18

gubi
Member
From: Walton
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 1344
Website

Re: leg colour

poplar girl, all you need is a couple of electric flock nets and somewhere for the chicks to get out of the rain and sun and you can raise a lot of chicks in the summer time.  Eat all the excess roosters, trust me they taste awesome and find homes for the extra pullets.  I have my flock net set around an old bank barn which gives some shade and a couple of chicken tractors for them to roost in at night.  At 3-4 weeks old they go outside and before that they really don't need a lot of room.  The off coloured legged pullets can be easily seen at 6-8 weeks so you can start rehoming those pullets then.

IPF
I don't quite understand the barring gene.  If it were sex linked only the roosters would have barring but the hens are supposed to have barring on them too, although many of ours show very little barring.


Herd of Brown Swiss, a few sheep, red cuckoo basque, Silverspangled Appenzeller Spitzhauben, ameraucanas(EE), Welsummer, broodie silkies and a few more heritage hens

Offline

 

2011-08-31 13:15:18

AdBot
Advertisements

#27 2011-08-31 14:06:50

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: leg colour

Gubi, why do you say "If it were sex linked only the roosters would have barring"? The roos have two B alleles, B/B, and the hens just one, B/-, but they both carry the dominant B gene and both would be barred. . . . am I misunderstanding something?

Also, Poplar girl, on the subject of green legs - I've been digging around and found the following quote from David what-his-name, the co-author of that great book on colour, and he says "Sex linked Barring. . . removes pigment from the shank ,so no dark legs. . . . [to get dark legs] you will need a miracle because you are trying to get a genetic impossibility."

Although the discussion there was about getting blue legs, as far as I know the only difference between blue and green legs is the colour of the epidermis (white vs yellow). So, if David says it's impossible. . . I just don't know.

Last edited by ipf (2011-08-31 14:39:14)

Offline

 

#28 2011-08-31 14:29:50

Skylinepoultry
Member
From: Old Fort, Tennessee
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 222
Website

Re: leg colour

ipf wrote:

Gubi, why do you say "If it were sex linked only the roosters would have barring"? The roos have two B alleles, B/B, and the hens just one, B/-, but they both carry the dominant B gene and both would be barred. . . . am I misunderstanding something?

The only way the male would carry one barring gene is if he was a mating from a double barred roo and a non barred gene carrying hen. The male off spring would only have one barring gene. Then you would have to do sibling matings from that crossing to get double barred genes back in a male and then its selective (DF)

Offline

 

#29 2011-08-31 14:46:24

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: leg colour

Yes, of course, but I assumed Gubi was talking purebred birds here, so homozygous at loci of interest, thus B/B roos and B/- hens, not a heterozygous cross (B/b). All purebreds of a barred breed should be barred, both m & f.

Maybe Gubi is talking about using the sexlinked gene to produce offspring where only the males are barred? This would be a barred hen (B/-) x a non-barred roo (b/b), giving barred boys (B/b and non-barred girls (b/-).

Offline

 

#30 2011-08-31 19:02:57

gubi
Member
From: Walton
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 1344
Website

Re: leg colour

No guys gubi just got confused.  Sex linked sounded to me that only one sex is barred.  So what is the difference between sexlinked barring and autosomal barring?


Herd of Brown Swiss, a few sheep, red cuckoo basque, Silverspangled Appenzeller Spitzhauben, ameraucanas(EE), Welsummer, broodie silkies and a few more heritage hens

Offline

 

#31 2011-08-31 19:16:58

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: leg colour

"sexlinked" just means the gene is carried on the sex (Z) chromosome, so barred males are, for example, B/B (or B/b) and barred females are B/-.

"Autosomal" refers to any chromosome that isn't a sex chromosome, so they come in matched pairs; genes on one of those pairs would be, for example, O/O (homozygous for blue egg allele). Autosomal barring seems to be due to a combination of interacting genes, but the main one is generally called Ab, so the genotype of an autosomal barred chook would be Ab/Ab or (Ab/ab).

Last edited by ipf (2011-09-01 00:40:06)

Offline

 

#32 2011-08-31 19:31:38

Skylinepoultry
Member
From: Old Fort, Tennessee
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 222
Website

Re: leg colour

Awesome ipf. So glad you're here.   :goodthread:

Offline

 

#33 2011-08-31 23:55:08

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: leg colour

The eggs are hatched from parent birds I have not seen so one or more hens may not have been barred. Or the rooster may only carry one gene for barring. One or both of those events are actually quite likely as in my first hatch from that source I got an unbarred pullet.  There may already be some pics of green legged barred marraduna EO Roos on here but I will try to post some pictures over the weekend. There is no question these roos have green legs and are barred.

Would one gene for barring (B/b) in a roo allow green legs? Or blue if the epidermis is white?

The males from Claire all carry two genes for barring as far as I can tell as all females have been barred. Birds from Black Horse Ranch (that is where the green legs are from) may not. Some of the females look more like gorria than marraduna.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

Offline

 

#34 2011-09-01 00:39:29

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: leg colour

If ANY offspring (male or female, regardless of the mother) of your barred rooster are non-barred, then he is definitely heterozygous (B/b).
There is a dosage effect with the barring gene, so yes, I think a heterozygote could (possibly) have blue or green legs. . .

Offline

 

#35 2011-09-01 05:00:27

Skylinepoultry
Member
From: Old Fort, Tennessee
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 222
Website

Re: leg colour

Hmmm, I've not had any with green legs. Did you look at those pics of Marradunas on this site yet ipf?
http://www.euskalroots.eu/galeria/gallery.html
Has anyone noticed how short the tail feathers are as well on the males. They look young but old enough to have fully developed tail feathers. Are they supposed to be that short I wonder?

Offline

 

#36 2011-09-01 11:44:43

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: leg colour

Skyline, no roosters with green legs (or blue) or no roosters OR hens with green (or blue) legs?

Regarding tail feather length, probably the start of a whole new discussion but hear is a link to the translated SOP for EOs Claire posted:
http://forums.euskaloiloas.com/viewtopic.php?id=69

My black horse ranch grandpa rooster has  noticeably shorter tail feathers than the EOs from Claire. The diversity in so few birds is amazing really. To get a flock as uniform (and looking like) as the one on that website will take awhile.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

Offline

 

#37 2011-09-01 14:04:02

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: leg colour

Wonderful pics! For some reason I couldn't scroll through them yesterday when I tried. That barring looks like classic sex-linked; stronger in the males, a bit blurrier in the females, with some modifier genes at work (but what?? That is the question!) Very interesting and beautiful colour patters.
When you say tails are short, do you mean compared to other EOs? They look to be well witin the general chook-range (over all breeds) to me.

Offline

 

#38 2011-09-01 16:53:25

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: leg colour

My 3 year old Euskal Oiloa roo (daddy and grandaddy of a lot of the Canadian EOs) has (too) long sickles!  They are white too :whistle:  they do look shorter on that site but there is variation between some of the pictures.  Some of the hens have no black columbian hackles too :chook:


http://i949.photobucket.com/albums/ad340/skefflinglavenderfarm/IMG_6499.jpg

Offline

 

Adverts

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB
Hosted by PunBB-Hosting