Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

A place to find out more and share what you know about this awesome rare poultry breed! **NOTE: Those who wish to register as a new member on the forum are asked to email eochickenforum@gmail.com and an Administrator will gladly help you join the forum!

You are not logged in.

Adverts

Adverts

#1 2012-04-19 00:05:09

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

This is one I would like to know more about. Most of my hens that are mottled are the biggest and friendliest. I am wondering how "mo" influences the males and females and if there is another gene or so coming into play. The also seem to be the best layers. As much as I love the Milles Fleurs" appearance, it is not desirable in the Maradunna. Where do you think it comes from? How can I best utilize these birds? Does it show up in the chicks?  Need help on this one.

Offline

 

2012-04-19 00:05:09

AdBot
Advertisements

#2 2012-04-19 00:05:53

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

Oh and how does the slow feathering gene affect this if at all?

Offline

 

#3 2012-04-19 02:07:39

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

Mottling is Mo+, mo. Wild type (Mo+) is not mottled, and dominant - for a bird to be mottled it has to be mo/mo. Also apparently needs the E allele at the E locus. It used to be thought that there were two genes, pi and mo, that caused pied plumage and mottles, but now it's accepted they're the same locus.
Haven't heard that the K alleles affect this. It's autosomal, and on a different chromosome from the one chromosome that carries Na, O and P (that one is the biggest, now known as chromosome 1).

"Chicks of . . . mottled breeds have black on the dorsal surface but are light yellow below and show varying amounts of light colour in the sides of the head." Hutt, p215. (note that Hutt (same page) still thinks pi and mo are different genes; this was disproved, I think, in the 70s.)

Last edited by ipf (2012-04-19 02:19:22)

Offline

 

#4 2012-04-19 02:24:47

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

From Topic 3, genetics study group:

poplar girl wrote:

I did some reading of my "Genetics of Chicken Colours The Basics" this morning Susan. It seems there is not a complete understanding of mille fleur even in breeds that are supposed to be that color so this is a tough question for me to answer.

My semi-educated response would be we are seeing the allele for mottled (mo) pop up. Although mottled is labelled as a recessive trait the book indicates that sometime even in a heterozygous individual you get mottling come through. The white mottle at the tip of the feather is not the addition of color it is a "hole" in the color. When the feather starts to grow the mo allele causes there to be no pigment in the first part. When the production of pigment starts again black pigment is produced faster than red pigment so you can get a black band as well. I think in our birds with more black in general you would see both white spots and black. Apparently white tips on the wing feathers might identify birds with mo.

The other possible way to creat a similar effect would be if this is spangling. Even more complicated than mottled and i don't think this is what we are seeing. A combination of the dominant pattern allele (Pg), melanotic black extending allele (MI) and mahogany (Mh) may be able to cause this effect. The Derbyshire Redcap is the only breed like that. There is no white in their spangles...but then they are not barred nor do they have the columbian restriction :huh: The "normal" way of causing spangling is with the Db (dark brown columbian) allele which EOs showing the columbian pattern with black in the hackles do not have.

So in summary I think the mille fleur EOs are showing the effect of the mottled allele mo.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

Offline

 

#5 2012-04-19 02:29:57

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

So how serious is the mottling? There are birds i would love to use use for breeding despite this. And what does it look like in the Roos?? Being recessive, sounds like it would be bad news to use them. Why are they so big? Does that have a genetic basis?

Offline

 

#6 2012-04-19 02:42:47

ipf
Member
From: Salt Spring Island, BC, Canada
Registered: 2011-08-29
Posts: 168

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

Size definintely has a genetic basis. THey probably inherited all sorts of other genes along with the mo ones.

Offline

 

#7 2012-04-19 11:17:22

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: Traits to consider... Mottling in feathers

Any APA judge would tell you that type is the most important thing. "build the barn before you paint it".


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

Offline

 

Adverts

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB
Hosted by PunBB-Hosting