Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

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#1 2011-07-02 14:36:48

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

The genetics of barring

The maraduna EO is barred and the genetics of the barring are important to understand when breeding.

I am sharing some information from Eric Rivard on barring as it related to maraduna EOs. Eric's first language is French so i have taken liberty of making the odd correction of the English for clarity. His English is AMAZING in comparison to my French so absolutely no criticism intended!

In particular the origin of this discussion was Susan's white rooster (that shows very faint barring) that is supposed to be pure breed maraduna EO.

Eric indicated:

Hi Suzan Not quite sure how the rooster got that white - but in my opinion over the long term it is harder to get rid of bad effects of inbreeding than it is to bring back a breed to the original color. But if you feel you are certain of the origin then you are to use this rooster. Do yourself a favor and only use your best hens and keep your best pullet from that mating and even if the roosters are very good looking don't keep the roosters for breeding. Good point he does carry the Barred gene, but still in my opinion seems to be Homozigous  "incomplete white"   next year use a better rooster.

Don't forget that hens only carry ONE gene for barring, the male can have ether 1 or 2 Barred genes, a male will show barred all the time, except if an other gene comes and covers it. If you get a non barred chicks from a barred hen and Barred rooster, this means that the rooster will be carrying only ONE Barred gene in the mating you will perform, barred hens will be ok to use next year.

What will follow is true but other factor will or may interfere in genetic physical expression.

The best breed everyone knows to show this point is the common meat bird, ROSS or CUBB's both carry BARRED+ RED+ COLOMBIAN gene in them but they are all covered by a DOMINANT WHITE GENE therefore the physical color express on the bird is WHITE.

I think a way every one will understand and to try to explain it good is to Take 3 cheap sheets of white paper

First sheet of paper write:  BARRED + RED + COLOMBIAN + OTHERS  with a big black marker
Second sheet write: incomplete dominant white with a wood pencil
Third sheet write: incomplete dominant white with a wood pencil
Now if putting paper #2 on the paper one you will still see paler BARRED RED COLOMBIAN but see best, incomplete dominant white on the top sheet.
Now putting sheet #3 over all this you will only see incomplete dominant white  but the rest is still under.

Lets take as an example Suzan's white Rooster.
Using this rooster will give either 1 of the 2 following diagrams as for Barred genes. The same will apply for the WHITE gene that the rooster is carrying but just change all the words BARRED for the word WHITE in the Diagram's rooster column and you get the picture of what she will be working with.
additional note: having 2 copys of incomplete white gene usually will give solid white birds, ether smoky white gene or incomplete will show other colors. To determine what white gene is involved, you may need to look at foot color also.

Both roosters will show Barring but:
Rooster #1 has one copy of the desired gene
http://www.geocities.ws/preservation/Pu … edgene.bmp
http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac252/sulzmi/9c30e10a.png            

Rooster #2 has 2 copies of the gene
http://www.geocities.ws/preservation/Pu … dgenes.bmp
http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac252/sulzmi/e6523bf4.png

In Susan's hypothetical mating, having some good and some not good females will indicate that the father has only one copy of barred gene. Having all good females will indicate that the father has 2 copies of Barred gene,  but still white gene in the mating may interfere with the expression of barred gene, so if she gets some good females the father has effectively only one gene of white and no other gene affects that gene.

Original Source:  http://sellers.kippenjungle.nl/page1.html

I am uncertain if I should be referencing the original forum that this was posted on?
http://www.punbb-hosting.com/forums/Alb … 4&p=16

Last edited by poplar girl (2011-07-02 14:49:15)


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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2011-07-02 14:36:48

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#2 2011-07-02 15:18:12

Young Heritage
Member
From: Gainesville, Georgia
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 157

Re: The genetics of barring

:thumbsup: Great info. Thx for posting


FBCM and Euskal Oiloa

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#3 2011-07-02 16:03:54

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: The genetics of barring

That looks great Susan.  I will email Eric too and tell him about our site.  It is referenced, so hopefully should be fine.  I have no problem linking to other forums if they have helpful info for us!

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#4 2011-07-02 18:35:25

gubi
Member
From: Walton
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 1344
Website

Re: The genetics of barring

How does the baring gene express itself in the marraduna colour?  I only have one hen that shows definite barring, and I haven't seen a single Canadian bird that looks like her? 
http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/268237_10150223604451227_556756226_7789318_3984306_n.jpg


Herd of Brown Swiss, a few sheep, red cuckoo basque, Silverspangled Appenzeller Spitzhauben, ameraucanas(EE), Welsummer, broodie silkies and a few more heritage hens

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#5 2011-07-02 22:16:56

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: The genetics of barring

I was wondering the same thing Gubi. The coloring of your hen looks like what I believe a maraduna EO is supposed to look.

One of my hens from the Black Horse Ranch line looks similar but I think the baring on your hen may be even better:
http://i905.photobucket.com/albums/ac252/sulzmi/ff8ae640.png

I wonder at what age you should evaluate barring?
And where are the speckles coming from?

Last edited by poplar girl (2011-07-02 22:18:17)


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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