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#1 2011-08-12 12:23:27

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

I am posting this info in case any of the Canadian Breeders want to ship eggs to USA.  I dismissed it before, because of our moving situation and have just looked it up. If you are not a certified hatchery, chicks cannot be mailed by Canadapost, so really we are looking at driving down to the border or the importer coming up.

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani … od5e.shtml

"Import Permits

15. No import permits are required from the USDA if the animals are presented for import at one of the U.S. land border ports listed at the end of this section and if they meet the specific requirements described in the following sections.

16. An import permit is required from the USDA for the following:

    any livestock (including semen or embryos), poultry, birds, or semen that are destined to enter the U.S. by air, sea or an inland port of entry other than those listed below;
    all fresh/frozen embryos that enter the U.S. without having been transferred to an eligible recipient;
    uncastrated sheep and goats for feeding;
    all animals, poultry, or semen from animal donors if the animals, poultry, or animal donors have been imported into Canada from a country other than the U.S., and have been resident in Canada less than 60 days, excluding any Canadian quarantine period; and
    An import permit may be required for Canadian animals transiting the U.S. for export to a third country.

17. Applications for import permits can be obtained from the following address:

U.S. Department of Agriculture
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Veterinary Service, National Center for Import and Export
4700 River Road, Unit 39
Riverdale, Maryland 20737
Telephone: 301-734-3277
Facsimile: 301-734-4704

18. For certain species, it may be necessary to obtain one or more Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) permits. Applications for CITES import/export permits can be obtained from the following addresses:
U.S. import permit:

Department of the Interior
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 432
Arlington, Virginia 22203
Telephone: 703-358-2104
Facsimile: 1-800-358-2104
Canadian export permit:

CITES Administrator
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment Canada
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0H3
Telephone: 819-997-1840 or 1-800-668-6767
Facsimile: 819-953-6283"


Down near the bottom, most relevant chicken info is

"5.10 Export to the U.S.—Birds, Poultry and Hatching Eggs
Interpretation

Bird: all members of the class Aves other than poultry.

Poultry: means domestic fowl and pigeons, including any bird in captivity: chickens, doves, ducks, geese, grouse, guinea fowl, partridges, pea fowl, pheasants, pigeons, quail, swans and turkeys (and their eggs for hatching).
Day-Old Poultry and Hatching Eggs (HA1942)
Health Certification

1. Export certificate HA1942 Export of Day-Old Poultry/Hatching Eggs to the United States of America must be used to certify day-old poultry and/or hatching eggs.

2. The flocks of origin and hatchery must have been inspected within 30 days of export and found to be free of any evidence of communicable diseases of poultry and, as far as it is possible to determine, must not have been exposed to any such disease in the 90-day period preceding the date of export.

3. The flock of origin must have participated in a pullorum eradication program recognized by Canadian veterinary officials.

4. The flock of origin of the day-old chicks or hatching eggs must have been maintained in the region from which they are being exported for at least 90 days immediately preceding the date of export.

5. Newcastle disease, fowl plague, or highly pathogenic avian influenza has not occurred on the premises of origin, or on any adjoining premises during the 90-day period preceding exportation.

6. The area where the premises of origin are located has not been under quarantine for avian diseases during the preceding 90 days.

7. Chicks or eggs are shipped in new, clean containers.

8. The exporter is responsible for determining and complying with any specific state or show requirements."

Problem is, no one I know of has a "pullorum eradication program".  I have never heard of it til I read this.  There seem to be very few vets comfortable dealing with poultry, and our vast geography doesn't help matters.  I will look into the Pullorum eradication program further.

Here's the shipping egg health form
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani … 1942_e.pdf

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2011-08-12 12:23:27

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#2 2011-08-12 15:35:20

Susan
Administrator
From: Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-28
Posts: 2540

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

On the plus side, here in Saskatoon, we have the Western College of Veterinary Medicine. There are number of poultry and exotics vets. The trick would be to see if any are willing to work with me to figure it out. CFIA was very helpful when I was looking into Importation questions. I wish Dr. Crawford was still on staff. He kept the heritage flocks at the U of S but is now retired. They no longer keep those flocks.

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#3 2011-08-13 04:25:01

3riverschick
Member
From: Ligonier, in Pennsylvania, USA
Registered: 2011-08-11
Posts: 64
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

Hi,
I *think* I may have an answer to the pollurrum eradification program mytery. I wonder how old those forms are. Apparently there was on at one time:
http://tinyurl.com/3l49o97
"The data were extracted from 3 computer systems in Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development (AAFRD),
including the Animal Health Information System (AHIS), the Animal Health Surveillance System (ANHSURS),
and the Passive Animal Health Surveillance System (PAHSS) databases. The AHIS data set included diagnostic
cases where samples were submitted for Salmonella culture, as well as submissions from the Poultry Health
Program (PHP), from October 1990 to December 1997. The PHP Salmonella cases were those associated with the
Canadian Food Inspection Agency activities and the AAFRD S. Gallinarum and S. Pullorum eradication program
, and included samples from both the birds and their environment. After 1997, the laboratory system in Alberta
became privatized and new systems were implemented.
Thus, 4 separate files were contained within the ANHSURS
data set from 1998 to 2001. These included: 1) disease investigations; 2) diagnostic cases; 3) PHP cases;
and 4) quality assurance cases. Disease investigations were diagnostic cases with at least 1 follow-up
investigation per case. Quality assurance submissions were cases in which a practicing veterinarian requested
post-mortem assistance. The PAHSS data set contained records from 1 private diagnostic laboratory on Salmonella
cases collected through passive surveillance between February 1998 and December 2001, and privatized poultry
cases (commercial poultry cases) from February 2000 to August 2001.Over the course of the study period,
Salmonella culture protocols varied by laboratory, sample purpose (diagnostic versus PHP), and sample type
(fecal/intestine/reproductive tract, other organs, feed, etc.). There were 4 laboratories until 1996, including
the main reference laboratory in Edmonton, and each was technically independent of the Edmonton lab. In 1996,
there were 2 laboratories that used the same protocols. Then in 2000, they became a single laboratory (Rashed
Cassis, 2004, personal communication). Samples to be tested for Salmonella spp. were processed according to
Standard Operating Procedures used by Agri-Food Laboratories Branch, Food Safety Division of AAFRD. Throughout
the study period, all laboratories used at least one type of enrichment media for both diagnostic and PHP
samples. Briefly, in the early to mid-1990’s, pre-enrichment and selective media included selenite broth,
selenite then rappaport broth, selenite cystine (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, United Kingdom) then rappaport broth,
peptone-glucose then rappaport broth, or buffered peptone (Difco, Detroit, Michingan, USA) then tetrathionate
broth (Difco). From 1996 onward, additional enrichment media included tryptic soy broth (Difco), tryptic soy
then selenite broth, or buffered peptone to each of selenite and tetrathionate broth. Culture plates used over
the years included: 1) hektoen, bismuth sulfite, and brilliant green agar (Difco) (1992 and earlier); 2) hektoen
and brilliant green agar (1994); 3) XLT4 (Difco) and rambach agar (1996 onward); and 4) rappaport-vassiliadis
semi-solid media specifically for the S. Enteritidis protocol (Difco) (1998) (Rashed Cassis, 2004, personal
communication). After incubation, viable colonies were biochemically and serologically confirmed as Salmonella
species. Standard culture protocols used by the Agri-Food Laboratories Branch to isolate Salmonella from fecal
and environmental samples have been described elsewhere (10)."
http://tinyurl.com/3l49o97


------------------------------------
The export info webpage also says:"11. The flock of origin must participate in a pullorum eradication program recognized by the veterinary officials of Canada or the flock of origin must have had its pullorum status confirmed through the use of other sampling methods such as environmental/fluff samples within the 90 days preceding export. Doves and pigeons are exempt from this requirement.

Samples must have been taken by the accredited veterinarian and submitted to provincial laboratories or to the Ontario Guelph laboratory.
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani … od5e.shtml
[i](Karen: so I am thinking this new sampling might have replaced the old eradification program? Yes? No?)[/i]

Last edited by 3riverschick (2011-08-13 04:28:25)


Karen Tewart
"The present is best served when we remember the past."

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#4 2011-08-14 11:36:58

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

3riverschick wrote:

The export info webpage also says:"11. The flock of origin must participate in a pullorum eradication program recognized by the veterinary officials of Canada or the flock of origin must have had its pullorum status confirmed through the use of other sampling methods such as environmental/fluff samples within the 90 days preceding export. Doves and pigeons are exempt from this requirement.

Samples must have been taken by the accredited veterinarian and submitted to provincial laboratories or to the Ontario Guelph laboratory.
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani … od5e.shtml
[i](Karen: so I am thinking this new sampling might have replaced the old eradification program? Yes? No?)[/i]

That is great Karen, this does seem to simplify things.  There must be a list of accredited veterinarians.  I had birds autopsied in Guelph last fall and had to go through a local veterinarian to officially receive results, and when all the results were finally in, her advice/conclusions contradicted the Guelph pathologist (who I had been in contact with from the start) 180 degrees, so finding veterinarians trained and comfortable with back yard poultry is definitely the issue round here.

That explains why we haven't heard of the Pullorum Eradication  Program =D

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#5 2011-08-14 20:29:37

3riverschick
Member
From: Ligonier, in Pennsylvania, USA
Registered: 2011-08-11
Posts: 64
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

So I am thinking getting eggs to the States is :
1. Find a Canadian flock which has been living at one place for more than 3 months.

2. Check the surrounding area to make sure no cases of disqualifiying pathogens have been reported.
The DQ pathogens are listed on CAN and US import/export sites.

3. Test the flock for required pathogens. Check US site to see if addtional pathgens are required
testing for import  above and beyond what CAN requires for export.

4. 21/2 months later check the surrounding area for reports of disqualifiying pathogens.
   a. If no reports filed, test the flock again for required pathogens as before. I didn't check,
but am guessing, by this time the flock owner will have 2 certificates of clean health on the flock.
Checking needs done to determine if copies(or the originals) need to go with the eggs to the
border to be presented to both CAN and US border Ag vets.

5.  Sometime between the 3 and 31/2 month marks from the 1st test, ( a 15 day window),
  box the eggs. Buyer or seller takes them to the CAN vet at the land border crossing.
For those in ON, land crossings near London or Niagrara Falls.

6. Get the inspection of the eggs and required health certificate from CAN state vet.

7. Cross the border and take the eggs to the US import vet and get his inspection and health certificate.

8. Drive on home with the eggs.

9 Misc info:  No US import permit is needed unless the poultry or eggs are crossing into
US by water or air. Land border crossings (including bridges like Detroit and Niagara Falls)
are considered land crossings.
There are lists on the CAN and US websites of locations for all Ag import/export vets on
both sides of the border at all border crossings. Appointments with CAN and US Ag
import/export vets should be made in advance to smooth the journey.
Also important. Check ahead of time with CAN ag authorties to make sure  the route from
the US border to the flock and from the flock back to the US border does not cross
any geographic area where any DQ pathogens have been reported. Driving thru one of these
areas will keep the eggs from leaving Canada. yes, they will probably check or they wouldn't
have put it in the regulations. Check ahead of time as this may affect the border crossing
used and the vet/appointments made.
Best Regards,
Karen                   :EO:
=============================
Actually, I am wondering about the dates of inspection here. The regs state:
"The export info webpage also says:"11. The flock of origin must participate in a pullorum eradication program recognized by the veterinary officials of Canada or the flock of origin must have had its pullorum status confirmed through the use of other sampling methods such as environmental/fluff samples within the 90 days preceding export. Doves and pigeons are exempt from this requirement.

Samples must have been taken by the accredited veterinarian and submitted to provincial laboratories or to the Ontario Guelph laboratory.
http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/ani … od5e.shtml
-------
Then we know it must be tested again within 30 days of export.
one of 2 things needs to happen to provide a window of more than 1 day for export before the 90 and 30 days limits expire. . One day windows are kinda hard to organize.
1.    1st test  120 days before export; 2nd test 90 days before export; 3rd test within 30 days of export. This way even the pickiest offcial can see the flock was healthy at least 90 days and 30 days.  *or*

2.   1st test 90 days before export. ; 2nd test 2 1/2 months later.  This way the window for 2nd health cert would expire 3 1/2 months after the 1st test but only 2 tests would be needed.   I think this method would work, and give the person recieving the eggs a 15 day window for the export to US before the last 30 day health cert expired.

Last edited by 3riverschick (2011-08-14 22:31:15)


Karen Tewart
"The present is best served when we remember the past."

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#6 2011-08-15 01:33:57

pops coops
Member
From: Saskatoon
Registered: 2011-08-04
Posts: 579
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

I will help in any way that I can , this breed is fantastic.


peafowl many colours, India blue, Silver pied, Black shoulder, Midnight black shoulder, Cameo, Buford bronze, Pieds, Whites, Purple pieds, Javas and others, Black copper marans, Wheaten marans, Blue cochins, Euskal Oiloa,  Americanas, BLRW, Jersey Giants, Silkies , Naked neck silkies, Ridley bronze Bourbon red, Guineas,  Eclectus, parrotlets, Bare Eyed Cockatoos Macaws.
http://popscoops.com/

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#7 2011-08-15 02:40:29

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

Wow you have certainly got it figured out.  Come September I am hoping to have  a bit more time to look into this and find a willing vet.  I'd love to be able to share our eggs/chicks south of the border! :thumbs:  I am hoping to hatch a few Euskla oiloa chicks this fall that may be ready by next spring to add to the number if we have to do a "condensed" order :chook:

I think we are 2 weeks in now.....:cheer:  I really should have candled them before I left.  Knowing the Euskals, they'll be popping out when I get home on the weekend, they were set 2 weeks tomorrow.  I have some serious broodies on the case!  ;)  How many EOs do you have Pops?

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#8 2011-08-15 19:56:40

3riverschick
Member
From: Ligonier, in Pennsylvania, USA
Registered: 2011-08-11
Posts: 64
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

Hi!,
  In order for others to export eggs  from you, I think all you have to do is keep your flock health checked for the pathogens required by US and CAN authorities. And periodically check to see no DQ pathogens have been reported in your locale. It's the buyer's responsibility to make sure they do the proper paperwork , make the vet appointments, check any other regs and plot a safe course thru non-pathogenic areas to and from the US border. Live fowl are a different matter.
Best,
Karen   :EO:

Last edited by 3riverschick (2011-08-16 03:20:42)


Karen Tewart
"The present is best served when we remember the past."

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#9 2011-08-16 04:26:31

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: Export Rules for hatching eggs from Canada to USA

I would think a disease free route more problematic than the locale for us here, we are a good 3 hours from the border.  I would think the nearest industrial poultry producers are 20 miles away!  It's beef round here if anything. 

The testing doesn't physically sound too onerous, depends what the inspections/dander testing involves.  Testing can be stressful, we had birds autopsied last year and it took aeons to get all the data back.  We have nothing to hide or fear though and Guelph were great to deal with.  It was the local vet that was obliged to be involved that was the most difficult part of the equation, they just don't have the training for small flocks and mine recommended culling the whole flock, and the pathologist said it wasn't necessary when I double checked - glad I did =D

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