Euskal Oiloa Chicken Forum

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#1 2013-01-14 01:14:17

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

This topic has been discussed in different ways a few times and touched upon many many times but perhaps with spring and the season for hatching chicks around the corner it is a good time to revisit.

Let me try to frame my thoughts...

Euskal oiloa are pretty new to North America, in Canada since around 2008 and in the USA since late 2010. Of the 5 varieties recognized in Spain only the marraduna and gorria were brought to North America. All birds in North America started from just a few individual chooks. People like Skeffling Lavender Farm can be thanked for initially recognizing the value of this breed in terms of its beauty, friendliness and productivity for both meat and eggs. Numbers and and distribution of the breed have increased substantially over the past few years in particular in the US with Skyline Poultry and Greenfire distributing the breed last year. In Canada the same has happened with more people owning the breed and selling hatching eggs, chicks and birds over the past couple of years.

The start of this forum was a huge step and has definately had a substantial impact on EOs in North America. We have also taken the step of writing a draft Standard of Perfection for the breed and the marraduna color. I believe by writting the SOP we pushed the breed in a certain direction, towards standardization as dictated by American Poultry Association. Whether we ever move towards having EOs recognized by the APA is yet to be determined and I would venture to say nothing we have done so far is irreversible, our path can still be redirected.

With regards to the forum and the SOP we must also recognize that not all people who own or breed and sell EOs are members of this forum. Not all are aware of the SOP. Not all agree with the general direction we have taken so far. Some who are members or guests are silent so we do not hear their opinions. And even within or small active membership i think goals and opinions vary.

So where does all that has happened so far leave us and perhaps more importantly where does that leave the EOs of North America?

Do we have a united mission, vision and goals for the Eusal Oiloak in North America? If so, what is it? If not, is that reason for concern?

What are your individual goals with the breed? Do you have the resources to achieve those goals?

Has the rapid distribution of EOs in the USA and Canada helped or hurt the breed?

Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose?

And what are your next steps with EOs if any? Is there a place for a group effort, through the forum or other means?

These are just a few thoughts and questions to stimulate some discussion. Please, I encourage everyone to add their own thoughts. No need to answer any of the questions above directly if you don't wish to, they are mostly to help stimulate discussion.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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2013-01-14 01:14:17

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#2 2013-01-14 01:52:51

Micah and Kiah
Member
From: West Grey
Registered: 2012-04-20
Posts: 839

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

It sounds like it is still early days for EOs in North America, 2008 was just 5 years ago. There has been lots of great work done by people on this forum as well as others across the continent. I am so impressed with what you have all begun and shared with the rest of us. There may be multiple paths that EO lovers may take in the future.  We may not agree with them all and that is ok.

I don't know if we have a united mission but I think we are united by a love of this wonderful, beautiful, bright, affectionate breed. 

If chicken people are anything like horse people, we may be similar in temperment to the breeds we like the best which means EO people are funny and affectionate.  :happycrowd"

What are your individual goals with the breed? I want to work towards breeding Maradunas that consistently achieve the S.O.P. It is important to me to breed towards an S.O.P. and get the breed I love recognized as a breed in the A.P.A.  As contrary as it sounds, I also want to keep playing with the Mille Fleur lines to develop a consistent Mille Fleur Large Fowl simply because they are so beautiful.

Do you have the resources to achieve those goals?  I have the resources to start but to achieve entry into the A.P.A. there will need to be working with at least 5 other EO people with this same goal.  It can't be done alone.  For the mille fleur L.F. I will play with this project and can do it on my own but already have plans to do some egg trades with other EO lovers.

Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose? Can't it be both or either? 

And what are your next steps with EOs if any? In another week we will begin our very first breeding groups!:excited:


All the best,

Kiah and Micah

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#3 2013-01-14 01:58:57

yardbirds
Member
From: just north of Yorkton, Sk.
Registered: 2012-07-09
Posts: 334

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

:goodthread:  and look forward to reading everyone's comments.  For myself, since I live in town and have an under the radar small backyard flock of 5 hens ( have been told it is allowed/not allowed ) so definitely no roosters or breeding for me.  I am tempting fate as I do want to expand my small flock to 8 or possibly 10.  Was told by a town councillor that they are not allowed as such but that if the neighbour's didn't mind or complain that I could probably get away with it, as I live on the last street in town and there are the sports grounds and bush behind my property.  He stated that I could probably have 3 hens.  My current neighbours are fine with my project that is in the running for about 18 months now and this is my oldest birds 2nd winter.  My goal if I have one is just to have a supply of colorful eggs for myself and family and share extras with the neighbours and one lady at work does buy a couple of dozen from me every couple of weeks or so.  If circumstances in my life were different, and a small acreage was affordable, that could possibly change, but approaching 60, in a few years, I realistically don't see that happening.  I certainly do enjoy all aspects of keeping my small backyard flock and being a member on several different forums, expanding my knowledge and interacting with some wonderful like minded people.  :EO:  and only 6 more days till mine hatch.  :thumbsup:

Last edited by yardbirds (2013-01-15 14:12:27)


urban flock consisting two EOs thx Prairie Chick, one True Blue Ameraucana, and two Welsummers, thx Dan Smith and a gorgeous Easter Egger Hen, thx Flicker Chick. and 2 GLW pullets, 1 GLW cockerel, 1 SLW cockerel, 1 true blue Ameraucana pullet, and 4 EE pullets and 1 Cream Brabanter pullet, Thx to FRF, Anneke, and Fallyn.

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#4 2013-01-14 03:40:50

skeffling lavender farm
Administrator
From: Wiarton, ON, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-17
Posts: 2720
Website

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

I am thinking about this one,  It is a tough one to answer right now with everything up in the air for us. :Crazy:

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#5 2013-01-14 08:39:03

Island Girl
Member
From: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Isla
Registered: 2011-07-06
Posts: 1403

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Thanks pg, great thread! I will be back on tomorrow so that I can ponder these points overnight. What :shock: do you mean you don't dream of chickens every night!!

XOX Monika

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#6 2013-01-14 12:33:00

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

poplar girl wrote:

This topic has been discussed in different ways a few times and touched upon many many times but perhaps with spring and the season for hatching chicks around the corner it is a good time to revisit.

Let me try to frame my thoughts...

Euskal oiloa are pretty new to North America, in Canada since around 2008 and in the USA since late 2010. Of the 5 varieties recognized in Spain only the marraduna and gorria were brought to North America. All birds in North America started from just a few individual chooks. People like Skeffling Lavender Farm can be thanked for initially recognizing the value of this breed in terms of its beauty, friendliness and productivity for both meat and eggs. Numbers and and distribution of the breed have increased substantially over the past few years in particular in the US with Skyline Poultry and Greenfire distributing the breed last year. In Canada the same has happened with more people owning the breed and selling hatching eggs, chicks and birds over the past couple of years.

The start of this forum was a huge step and has definately had a substantial impact on EOs in North America. We have also taken the step of writing a draft Standard of Perfection for the breed and the marraduna color. I believe by writting the SOP we pushed the breed in a certain direction, towards standardization as dictated by American Poultry Association. Whether we ever move towards having EOs recognized by the APA is yet to be determined and I would venture to say nothing we have done so far is irreversible, our path can still be redirected.

With regards to the forum and the SOP we must also recognize that not all people who own or breed and sell EOs are members of this forum. Not all are aware of the SOP. Not all agree with the general direction we have taken so far. Some who are members or guests are silent so we do not hear their opinions. And even within or small active membership i think goals and opinions vary.

So where does all that has happened so far leave us and perhaps more importantly where does that leave the EOs of North America?

Do we have a united mission, vision and goals for the Eusal Oiloak in North America? If so, what is it? If not, is that reason for concern?  Seems pretty obvious to me that everybody on this forum loves EOs, and that the vision would be to ensure that others get the same great experiences out of raising these birds.

What are your individual goals with the breed? Do you have the resources to achieve those goals? My desire was to have one breed of farm/homestead chicken that would be self sufficient in it's own right - hardy, sustainable, approachable by me and my small children, prolific of eggs, delicious on the table, and beautiful in my yard. Now after a year's research I would add that I want to be a 'breeder of MEOs', someone with the skills and knowledge to maintain and preserve all these wonderful characteristics.

Has the rapid distribution of EOs in the USA and Canada helped or hurt the breed? Yes

Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose? Yes

And what are your next steps with EOs if any? Is there a place for a group effort, through the forum or other means? To continue to learn to breed MEOs, having fun along the way, teaching my children animal husbandry through chickens, teaching my children love and respect for these creatures from egg to the table, all the ups and downs from predators, sickness and the hatchet, to hatch day, point of lay and every day that makes one smile just watching these birds' antics. With my lifestyle, responsibilities and station, I don't foresee myself ever showing birds, but would be tickled pink if my birds were worthy of showing to the standard, and supportive of those that would show. And yes, there has to be a place for a group effort, if even at the lowest level of establishing a next generation of chicken breeders that love the EO as we do and are willing to learn the techniques of maintaining and preserving the breed, and put them into use.

These are just a few thoughts and questions to stimulate some discussion. Please, I encourage everyone to add their own thoughts. No need to answer any of the questions above directly if you don't wish to, they are mostly to help stimulate discussion.

Just some other rambling, random thoughts...

I'm sure most of you realize I had never kept a chicken before Sept. 2011. You may or may not realize I have young twins, one a livewire, rootin tootin pistol of a boy that seems to dominate everything, and the other a sweet little girl that wants to be a vet, have horses, etc. But by their very nature and personality one seem to get what they want while the other gets pushed aside. And I don't have room or finances to keep horses... so we wound up with chickens. Every time I see my screen name on here and BYC, I am reminded that I am HER dad too, and have duties and responsibilities to her also. So began our chicken adventure, and my little vet is learning in a kid sized, age appropriate manner.

That said, I selected these bird because of Claire's and James' (and all you old schoolers on here ;)) recommendations of the breed. Plus a hope that this stock would still have the characteristics of the basques in Spain, and not have deteriorated and gone the way of so many breeds here in the states. More to come later, gotta run for now. :hi:

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#7 2013-01-14 12:42:22

Lindy Lou
Member
From: Priceville, Ontario
Registered: 2011-07-03
Posts: 999

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Reading your post MD brought a lump to my throat. Your remarks summed up so many of the reasons why I keep and love EO's and why we absolutely must see that their numbers continue to grow. On a more personal note I to once was a little girl who dreamed of being a vet but through a bad set of circumstances never got my dream. To this day it will be my greatest regret. Try to the very best of your ability to see that your little girl get the chance to realize hers.

Last edited by Lindy Lou (2013-01-14 19:01:31)


Some of us are driven by the need to make animals a part of our lives. We are soothed by their presence, fascinated by their behavior, and amused by their antics.

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#8 2013-01-14 17:25:56

NaturesPace
Member
From: Augusta county VA, USA
Registered: 2011-12-20
Posts: 915
Website

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

I'll answer just a few of these.

What are your individual goals with the breed?
I'm really thrilled with EOs, but I'm not committed to breeding toward the SOP. i was drawn to them for similar reasons that MD brought up. Homesteading, forage abilities, eggs and meat, good mothers and friendly. As most of you know I have hatched some mixes. I don't plan on trying to breed any of these back to EOs and eventually call them EOs. It's just for fun.

Do you have the resources to achieve those goals? If I have broody hen, I'm all set.

Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose? Both. Even though I'm not breeding toward the SOP, I really enjoy understanding the ins and outs of genetics. I also enjoy having fun.

And what are your next steps with EOs if any? I'm going to enjoy my birds and if there are any that are outstanding, I'll probably let Glen have them so he can work towards the SOP.


More pictures and videos of chicks. www.outoforderacres.com

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#9 2013-01-14 19:25:27

Island Girl
Member
From: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Isla
Registered: 2011-07-06
Posts: 1403

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

poplar girl wrote:

This topic has been discussed in different ways a few times and touched upon many many times but perhaps with spring and the season for hatching chicks around the corner it is a good time to revisit.

Let me try to frame my thoughts...

Euskal oiloa are pretty new to North America, in Canada since around 2008 and in the USA since late 2010. Of the 5 varieties recognized in Spain only the marraduna and gorria were brought to North America. All birds in North America started from just a few individual chooks. People like Skeffling Lavender Farm can be thanked for initially recognizing the value of this breed in terms of its beauty, friendliness and productivity for both meat and eggs. Numbers and and distribution of the breed have increased substantially over the past few years in particular in the US with Skyline Poultry and Greenfire distributing the breed last year. In Canada the same has happened with more people owning the breed and selling hatching eggs, chicks and birds over the past couple of years.

The start of this forum was a huge step and has definately had a substantial impact on EOs in North America. We have also taken the step of writing a draft Standard of Perfection for the breed and the marraduna color. I believe by writting the SOP we pushed the breed in a certain direction, towards standardization as dictated by American Poultry Association. Whether we ever move towards having EOs recognized by the APA is yet to be determined and I would venture to say nothing we have done so far is irreversible, our path can still be redirected.

With regards to the forum and the SOP we must also recognize that not all people who own or breed and sell EOs are members of this forum. Not all are aware of the SOP. Not all agree with the general direction we have taken so far. Some who are members or guests are silent so we do not hear their opinions. And even within or small active membership i think goals and opinions vary.

So where does all that has happened so far leave us and perhaps more importantly where does that leave the EOs of North America

Do we have a united mission, vision and goals for the Eusal Oiloak in North America? If so, what is it? If not, is that reason for concern?
I think everyone will have their personal goals for EOs but I think it would be great if there was a united goal of breeding toward a SOP, so that they can become a recognized breed here like in Spain.


What are your individual goals with the breed? Do you have the resources to achieve those goals?
I want people to be able to have an opportunity to enjoy these birds the same way that I have. I have a new coop and feel that I am set up to do these birds justice, just not sure how to proceed at this time. Honestly I am worried that people will ruin them before they have a chance to reach their potential, maybe an uneducated opinion but I am trying to work through it.


Has the rapid distribution of EOs in the USA and Canada helped or hurt the breed?
I am torn about this answer, but ultimately I think that the more people that have EOs the higher the chance that people with breeding knowledge will improve them, or ... then again the more people may ruin them, or .... :banginghead:


Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose?
I found this one easy to answer, to me this forum is most definitely a fun and friendly place to enjoy but has already served the higher purpose of educating me and it gives me a place to concentrate on just EOs.


And what are your next steps with EOs if any? Is there a place for a group effort, through the forum or other means?
I am in the process of counting down the days until I can start collecting eggs for breeding even though I am not sure I should start making them available to others! What a conundrum!!



These are just a few thoughts and questions to stimulate some discussion. Please, I encourage everyone to add their own thoughts. No need to answer any of the questions above directly if you don't wish to, they are mostly to help stimulate discussion.

I'm not really sure what you mean by a group effort? Are you referring to the SOP format or something else? I don't want to miss anything here! These are great questions and I am looking very forward to reading other responses, I also love how it helps us get to know one another better! :goodthread:

XOX Monika

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#10 2013-01-15 02:46:34

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

I am really enjoying reading everyone's responses and I think it may really help serve a few really important purposes if members can better understand their own goals as well as the goals of others on the forum. Although different people most certainly have different goals with regards to EOs i think we are already seeing some trends.

Perhaps at this stage I will try to answer my own questions.

Do we have a united mission, vision and goals for the Eusal Oiloak in North America? If so, what is it? If not, is that reason for concern?
We seem to be united in our love of the breed which is great. It does seem that people's plans and goals for their EOs vary and I think that's to be expected and is no reason for concern.

What are your individual goals with the breed? Do you have the resources to achieve those goals?
My first goal is to enjoy them. Chickens are a hobby for me and I am pleased I have managed to stick to just a few breeds so I have the resources to focus my efforts. I love the idea of being able to work with EOs and over a few years see my breeding and selection result demonstrated in my birds.  I am very fortunate to have the time, support and facilities that I think will be needed to reach my goals with the EOs. What I lack though is knowlege, I have only been attempting to breed and show chickens for a few years now and I still have a lot to learn. I do love that I have had the opportunity to learn right along with a wonderful group of people like the members of this forum.

Has the rapid distribution of EOs in the USA and Canada helped or hurt the breed?
No I don't think that it has hurt the breed. I do think those who choose to share EOs with others have a responsibility to make sure that their actions are in the best interest of the breed. But at the end of the day, as long as the chickens resulting from it all are well cared for that that's all that matters, it is a hobby after all.

Is the EO forum just a fun and friendly place to enjoy or should it serve a higher purpose?
Both for sure. I enjoy the light and friendly aspects of the forum but i also enjoy some of the deeper subjects. Sometimes I wonder if members are expecting more of the forum, for example so far this winter we really haven't touched on genetics or some of the other "deeper" topics. Does that disappoint anyone? I guess I put out there the invitation to any member interested to post what interested them and make sure you voice your questions, concerns and suggestions as I think we definately have a great group of people here and I want to see us continue to communicate, have fun and learn together.

And what are your next steps with EOs if any? Is there a place for a group effort, through the forum or other means?
Eggs from pair matings soon...the breeding pens are almost all finished and the roosters have been separate from the hens for almost 2 weeks now. I need to be done hatching by mid April this year as we are planning a trip to Italy in the fall. I do intend to show a few EOs this year. I feel I need the input from more experienced poultry people to continue to move forward with the EOs. I am beginning to fear I will veer off I a bad direction without that type of support. The forum is a great pleace for many things EO and I wouldn't willingly be without it but I don't live close to any members and I need someone to help me evaluate my birds who can hold them and see them in person. So I hope taking birds to a show or two a year in Alberta will provide that additional feedback I need right now as well as in the longer run help raise awareness and respect for the breed so if we do want to have it recognized by the APA we are set up to do so.

Notice the "we" on APA recognition. But I think we have a generation or two to go before deciding if the time is right to move ahead with that.

I think as much as we can there should also be a "we" (the members of EOCF) to helping to raise awareness of EOs in a positive way. I hope people interested in understanding and raising EOs will feel there is value in our forum. And i hope it can continue to grow and evolve along with EOs in North America.


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#11 2013-01-15 02:48:33

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Monika, to me this is one form of group effort - because were are bouncing ideas and thoughts off one another.

Another form that I am cultivating is much like NP just said. If get lucky and hatch more promising K and P than I need at the moment, then I'm going to be looking to home those birds at different locations... hedging my bets against predators (of which there is a lot of pressure around here) and also disease, with which we have been lucky so far. I'd love to have gene pools stashed at several locations, preferably with like minded EO breeders, but if they are just local laying flocks, that's fine too. Care will need to be taken in recording and maintaining parentage and generations etc.

The biggie group effort, though, is going to be working together to meet the SOP requirements of getting a new breed recognized. The Cream Legbar thread (and club) on BYC that LBB mentioned in another thread is an exciting example of what folks can do when they pull together with a common goal.

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#12 2013-01-15 02:56:22

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

MD, I haven't read the cream legbar thread. Are there some good ideas you can share that might help us with EOs?


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#13 2013-01-15 03:01:16

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

PG - that last paragraph of yours is the kicker... If we as breeders of EO can breed and maintain our flocks to the Standard, and this is where we hang out, then this forum is indeed most relevant. It will be the go to place for folks interesting in having these birds. If we don't, or can't, then we join the rank and file of those that breed willy nilly - and have nothing but willy nilly chickens running around injust two or three years.  That's all it takes to ruin a flock. For me it's just like a Rubik's cube - I can grab that thing and mix it all up with just 6 or 7 twists, but dang it takes me weeks of twisting to put it back right!  :sad:

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#14 2013-01-15 03:04:15

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Well said MD, and a very good analogy...I hope I do better with chickens than I did the Rubik's Cube :nervous:)


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#15 2013-01-15 03:07:06

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

poplar girl wrote:

MD, I haven't read the cream legbar thread. Are there some good ideas you can share that might help us with EOs?

http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/71311 … perfection

I was just offering it up as an example of folks working together. Getting a breed recognized is quite a project,something one person alone cannot do. I was impressed with what they had accomplished in such a short period of time.  Walt Leonard pops in from time to time too offering ideas and suggestions. That kicks the way cool factor off the charts for me.=D

You might also recognize some folks from on here... :hi:

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#16 2013-01-15 13:10:30

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

poplar girl wrote:

What are your individual goals with the breed? Do you have the resources to achieve those goals?
My first goal is to enjoy them. Chickens are a hobby for me and I am pleased I have managed to stick to just a few breeds so I have the resources to focus my efforts. I love the idea of being able to work with EOs and over a few years see my breeding and selection result demonstrated in my birds.  I am very fortunate to have the time, support and facilities that I think will be needed to reach my goals with the EOs. What I lack though is knowlege, I have only been attempting to breed and show chickens for a few years now and I still have a lot to learn. I do love that I have had the opportunity to learn right along with a wonderful group of people like the members of this forum.

Has the rapid distribution of EOs in the USA and Canada helped or hurt the breed?
No I don't think that it has hurt the breed. I do think those who choose to share EOs with others have a responsibility to make sure that their actions are in the best interest of the breed. But at the end of the day, as long as the chickens resulting from it all are well cared for that that's all that matters, it is a hobby after all.

PD, I'm quoting you because your answers are making me think . My responses here are a different angle of looking at things,not a refutation (is that a word?! :chairhide: ) or a disagreement of what you are saying...

You mention goals. I'm going to substitute 'motivation' with 'goals' as being synonymous. What motivates the breeder? It has been my experience that if money (read profit) motivates the breeder, then many important areas affecting the breed will suffer. From what I have gathered from anecdotal evidence, this is less a problem north of the border than it is south of the border. The breed was made available to the public on the south side, just a little over a year ago. Already one supplier has bailed, citing 'Lack of Interest' (read not enough profit). Maybe that's what's best for the breed, I think they are in better, more capable hands now....

The other, for all intents and purposes, abandons discussion of the breed, ie: no description of problems, flaws and troubles, no photos of current breeding stock, and no interest in the same that the new breeders may be experiencing.

So I leave you with this thought - How does the current southern EO rank on the point scale of the SOP? If rapid distribution of flock bred birds that are in the low 80s or DQed is the result, vs quality paired pairs and trios that consistently produce birds in the low to mid 90s (which currently isn't happening) then yes, rapid distribution hurts the EO.  If I raise chickens and teach my children self-sufficiency, I win and my children win. But only through caring and knowledgeable breeding to the SOP will the EO win. Without this, the average chicken keeper becomes disheartened from 'product not as advertised' and 'results not repeatable in your coop' , and there goes another pretty chicken in the pages of history. This is how I think rapid distribution has hurt the breed.

There are many, many different breeds chickens, each developed to fill a purpose, a need, whether it be the egg basket, the table, pleasing to the eye, or all of the above. It is through fixing a title, then a SOP to the breed, that everyone can look at chicken and say "Hey! There is a _____!" That is how upholding and breeding to the SOP serves to preserve and maintain.

(climbs down off soapbox...) :thanks:

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#17 2013-01-15 13:52:55

poplar girl
Administrator
From: Athabasca, AB, Canada
Registered: 2011-06-30
Posts: 3159

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Can't disagree with what you have said at all MD, the aspects you mention HAVE hurt the breed. But I would say they have also helped the breed and, without going into all th reasons, that is how i decided that the impacts of rapid distribution have, so far been been neutral and came up with my answer above.

How can it have both helped AND hurt? Well, those two major suppliers you mention above brought the EOs to the USA. They got word of the breed out and they distributed lots of birds in a very short time. So if all of that had not happened in the USA where do you think the breed would be? Would you have EOs? Would other active US members on the forum have EOs? Would this forum have started without that interest?

I have to go to work so I will continue this idea when I get home tonight...I have more to add for sure.

Oh and I must say :thanks: for your refutation of my answer, discussion and a bit of debate are what will make this thread even more useful' it's exactly what we all need to get ideas out and make us think ;)


Raising red cuckoo (marraduna) Euskal Oiloak and self blue (lavender) & black Belgian Bearded d'Uccles.

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#18 2013-01-15 14:28:06

dahlisgrams
Member
From: NY
Registered: 2012-08-06
Posts: 267

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

:surfing:  I can absolutely see both sides of rapid distribution and look forward to hearing more viewpoints.

I think getting numbers up initially was important, but now the real work begins. If numbers are the only concern, the breed will surely suffer and perhaps already has to some extent. My wheels are turning... :goodthread:

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#19 2013-01-15 14:37:55

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

@ PG - you are absolutely right! In my post #6, I simply stated yes to your two sided question. Here I was fleshing out my reasons for the negative aspect of your question.

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#20 2013-01-15 20:56:32

riverbendfarm
Member
From: Baker Settlement, Nova Scotia
Registered: 2012-05-01
Posts: 214
Website

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

All good things to consider for sure. As a rookie EO owner I NEED you guys to help me choose stock that is leaning closer to SOP. The feedback in the forum has been so good at educating me about what I should be looking for in my birds. We like friendly chooks, and good layers here at the farm, but we also know that we should have a target to shoot for.

I'll be bringing in new hatching eggs this spring to widen my "families". My current goals for my own flock's breeding program is to hatch out a large number of chickens this winter/spring/summer, and then cull HARD in the fall to the standard we are looking for. At that point I will be banding my birds into groups and beginning to closely document my breeding. Right now I have only 1 rooster that I would breed, as Ham has developed leg problems and I won't chance that its something genetic rather than an injury. So all my new chicks are going to be thrown by 'Niller until my hatching eggs arrive.

I need to read that Cream Legbar thread,..those chickens are BEAUTIFUL!

Thanks to everyone for weighing in and sharing your wisdom and experience with rookies like me =).


No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.
~Heraclitus

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#21 2013-01-15 23:29:37

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

I so glad we have this place to talk chickens! Folks around home start looking at me sideways after 15 minutes of chicken talk... :oops:

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#22 2013-01-16 00:42:19

Island Girl
Member
From: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Isla
Registered: 2011-07-06
Posts: 1403

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Maggiesdad wrote:

I so glad we have this place to talk chickens! Folks around home start looking at me sideways after 15 minutes of chicken talk... :oops:

You get 15 minutes of chicken talk in before the sideways look, wow! I can usually only get in 5 minutes before hubby gets the glazed over look. He says its the concussion, I say he is using it as an excuse :funny: You should have seen the look on his face when I started some chicken math on the drive to dinner last night. :roadtrip: " Now honey, could you help me figure out how many EO boys I need to raise to feed us for a year. One cockerel gives us two meals, are you listening honey? The breast gives us another meal, so two meals per bird. We eat chicken around twice a week, times that by 52 weeks. Hmmm, well we have to consider the 50/50 pullet to cockerel ratio too, so honey, honey are you sure you are with me on this?" Hmmm, he certainly did get that look on his face, good thing it was only a 25 minute drive, LOL :gunslinger:

XOX Monika

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#23 2013-01-16 01:01:30

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

:funny: Throw those leftover bones in with the neck and feet and make up some stock for the best soup you ever had! Those boys have some gel in them. :eat: You can wring one more meal outta those boys!  :love:

Not trying to knock your hatch numbers back, I'm just sayin!
;)

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#24 2013-01-16 01:12:14

Island Girl
Member
From: Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Isla
Registered: 2011-07-06
Posts: 1403

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

:hi: :eat:  for sure, I have pressure cooked the carcasses and made delicious chicken stock, so you use the feet too?

XOX Monika

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#25 2013-01-16 01:17:28

Maggiesdad
Moderator
From: Louisa County, Virginia
Registered: 2011-10-05
Posts: 1980

Re: What might the future of EOs in North America look like?

Yep, they add a lot of gelatin. The feet are the main reason I scald and pluck. Gets them nice and clean. If I'm bagging and freezing parts, I just tuck them in with the backs and necks and vac seal them for when I'm ready to make soup.

Gosh I'm getting hungry now just thinking about it! =D

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